Asia Pacific
 
By Carol Anne Eby on Friday, November 4, 2016
 One-hundred and 15 wheelchairs recently rolled off a ship at the Island of Tonga, changing lives for disabled people across the island, thanks to a partnership between numerous groups initiated by a Nazarene mission leader in Alabama, U.S.Fred Faith, former president of Nazarene Missions International (NMI) for the Alabama North District, visited Tonga to help layman Donald Hunter in building a missionary house there. During the trip he met with Nazarene missionaries In-kwon Kim and his wife Jeong-Seok Kim, directors of The Mango Tree Centre, which provides rehabilitative therapy,...
By Rebecca Moisio on Tuesday, October 4, 2016
El fin de semana pasado me encontraba en una conferencia de Trabajo y Testimonio en Columbus, Ohio (Estados Unidos). Allí recibí un brazalete. El mismo dice: "¿Qué tienes en tus manos? Pasión y Propósito, Éxodo 4:2." Se refiere a Moisés. Dios le preguntó a Moisés qué tenía él en sus manos. Él tenía una vara--una vara de pastor. Con esta vara, Moisés pastoreó una nación entera fuera de su captividad y hacia su libertad. Esto es algo grande y muy importante para sostener en tus manos. El hombre que me dio el brazalete es un misionero. Él tiene mucho en sus manos. Él es piloto, tiene una...
By Rebecca Moisio on Friday, September 30, 2016
Last weekend, I was at a Work & Witness conference in Columbus, Ohio (U.S.). There, I was given a bracelet. It says: "What's In Your Hands? Passion and Purpose, Exodus 4:2." It refers to Moses. God asks him what is in his hands. It's a staff -- a shepherd’s staff. With this staff, Moses shepherds an entire nation out of captivity and into freedom. That's a big, important thing to hold in your hands. The man who gave me the bracelet is a missionary. He has a lot in his hands. He's a pilot, has significant medical training, years of experience in law enforcement, and he runs the...
By Engage magazine on Tuesday, August 9, 2016
Enoch Tee is a graphic designer and photographer for World Mission Communication in the Asia-Pacific Region, based in Manila, in the Philippines. He began his assignment in 2014. As part of his service, he develops visual arts pieces such as logos and banners for the region, and also conducts usability testing and research for websites. With his camera he provides photojournalism, including at events.  He says: "These are the behind the scenes work of the Church, but these are also vital to the mission of spreading the Gospel -- telling what the Lord is doing through the Church and...
By Kaitlyn Williams on Wednesday, July 27, 2016
The scent of burnt wood, grass, flesh, and various debris filled the air in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea in September 2015. It was Independence weekend, but tribal war in this Pacific Island nation is still a reality. A death the day before tragically had triggered tribal rivals’ revenge, burning many homesteads, animals, and destroying other property. It left nothing but ashes and brokenness behind. On the grassy hillsides of the Wahgi Valley are the communities of Kudjip and Banz. Nearby, live people who for centuries have worked the ground, and built their lives there. Out of...
By Karla Deuel on Wednesday, June 8, 2016
Twenty minutes, that’s all.  Only 20 minutes to fly from the Mission Aviation Fellowship hanger at Kagamuga Airport in Mt. Hagen, Papua New Guinea, to the Dusin Airstrip, on the side of a mountain at 6,100 feet.  The flight itself is good for the soul on two counts: one being the weeks it may have taken us to walk over the sharp jutting hills that stretch over two huge valleys; and two, the scenery itself, as we fly about 300 feet above the jungle canopy, up and over the natural passes that end in a box canyon at Dusin.The remote airstrip was hand dug in 1970 by the Koban people,...
By Leody Eschavez on Friday, March 25, 2016
In May 2014, I moved to Zamboanga City, a 12-hour bus ride from my hometown in the Philippines. I had just graduated from university. I wasn’t sure what I was getting into, but my church had asked me to go and I said yes.Eight months earlier, Zamboanga had experienced a 20-day battle between the Philippine military and a separatist organization that had left more than 60,000 people displaced. I was sent to work in the Mampang transitory site where 10,000 people had been relocated.Most of the people I work with are from the Badjao tribe, an ethnic group who live in the seaside areas of the...
By Dave Hane on Wednesday, March 9, 2016
In the year 1206, Genghis Khan founded the Mongol Empire. Today, 3 million people live in the vast expanse of high plains called the country of Mongolia. It is the most sparsely populated nation in the world. Most Mongolians are either Tibetan Buddhists or atheists.Nazarene missionaries Sunny and Lisa Um moved to Darkhan, Mongolia, in 2012. The temperatures in parts of Mongolia are below freezing from November to March, and -40 is common. (-40 degrees happens to be the point where the temperature is the same for both Fahrenheit and Celsius.) Many of the people still live in heavily insulated...
By Jaron Graham on Tuesday, March 1, 2016
I remember well the black and white picture on the wall and the questions that ran through my young mind as I studied it. Who are those people? Why do we have their picture hanging in our church fellowship hall? How old is it? How old are they?!The picture of “our missionaries” Wallace and Mona White (left) was a mainstay in my home church in Lovington, New Mexico, U.S. We held children’s church and VBS, ate at numerous potlucks, and ran wild while our parents practiced for worship team, all under their watchful eyes.The story goes something like this: Sometime in the 1950s, Wallace and...
By Dr. Erin Meier on Wednesday, February 24, 2016
For the past few weeks, things at the Nazarene Hospital at Kudjip, Papua New Guinea, have been a bit gloomy. Some of the gloom has been due to the rain, power outages, wet shoes, and darker days, but a lot of the gloom has been because the hospital received confirmation that our budget for the year was going to be 40 percent less than we received from the Papua New Guinea government in 2015. A 40 percent reduction in our budget isn't something that we can easily make up from other areas. As we have shared ideas for how to continue offering the same medical services as in prior years,...

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